The winds of change in Hungarian Research

                     I have been transcribing the Hungarian census of 1869 from microfilms for many years at my Family History Center. I am always happy when my work delivers crucial family information to others. It's still my favorite census to work on as it's so detailed for such a relic of a census. Today, the entire Hungarian 1869 census is online at FamilySearch. Although not indexed, it is available to anyone who can read the language to research. It is a dream come true to have these records online.

1956 Hungarian Refugees

How I use Family Search "Source Box" for my One-Name Study

 

This may seem over-simplistic but I use the Family Search Source Box folders as one tool to organize my one-name-study.

Helpful "Place Locator" tip for your Hungarian ancestor's village

      Picture this research dilemma scenario for your Hungarian research; You finally found the naturalization records for your great- grandfather and it contains the name of his birthplace. Or you think you found him in the Ellis Island database with a village mentioned in their records. Perhaps you found his American marriage record at the Reformed church and it lists his place of origins. However, when you look at the map or Wikipedia it, it does not come up.

Whose blogging Hungarian family history ?

  In doing Hungarian genealogy, I encountered many wonderful blogs along the way. Many gifted writers generously share their research experiences on blogs. Here are some great bloggers writing about their Hungarian genealogical research. Some have been around a long time; some are new. Some blogs listed here cover their research in Hungary; some write about their genealogical forays in countries that were once part of Hungary, such as Croatia, Slovakia, Romania and other locations.

Using FamilySearch EXPORT function in Slovakian and Hungarian records

So where is the Hungarian census of 1857 ?

We know it exists. This particular census was called the "Josephine " census because it was the census ordered by Emperor Joseph II of Austria - Hungary to count men for military service [1]  We know that some rolls of it are at the National Archives of Hungary. Some are also at Family History Archives because the Genealogical Society of Utah filmed it in 1970.

Do you know what your ancestral home looks like?

 

     When you research all your families as you crawl back in time, do you wanderlust about the places they lived in?  Of course, as we go further back, our wish list of  "travel to ancestral home visits" gets longer.

Wiki for Hungary

 

     Folks should be aware that the webinar - WIKI FOR GENEALOGISTS - is a great introduction to the way of the Wiki world in genealogy. It really answers many questions about how versatile wiki can be for genealogists. The ideas are endless and so well presented by the wiki genealogist,  Thomas MacEntee.

Hungary Exchange & Nick Gombash

                  One day, while on the Hungary-L  genealogy mailing list, a serious, young man popped in named Nick Gombash.  It was this link to his website HUNGARY EXCHANGE that opened my eyes to realize that we have a great organizer amongst us   -  http://www.hungaryexchange.com/books I was so grateful that someone actually took the time to gather all the digital books about genealogy in Hungary in one spot and share them with us. Generosity in it's finest moment.

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